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We’ve long been fans of Dove and the way the company unrolls all of these clever #BodyPositive campaigns. It’s because of that that we’re used to people flipping out over the brand and its awesome messages… just not in a bad way.

Unfortunately for the marketing powers that be, they obviously didn’t anticipate the negative reactions that Dove’s new bottle shapes would bring. You see, these “Real Beauty Bottles” come in six different shapes and sizes to emulate a women’s body, and range from things like the classic pear and apple shapes to tall and slim and curvy and rounded.

“Each bottle evokes the shapes, sizes, curves and edges that combine to make every woman their very own limited edition,” the company said in a statement. “They’re one of a kind — just like you. But sometimes we all need reminding of that. Recent research from the Dove Global Beauty and Confidence Report revealed that one in two women feels social media puts pressure on them to look a certain way. Thankfully, many women are fighting with us to spread beauty confidence.”

Okay sure, that’s all fine and well, but people aren’t exactly equating these bottles with body confidence. It’s more like the company has opened itself up to endless mockery and ridicule instead.

So far the company has yet to respond, but we imagine that’s probably because the higher ups are still in shock. After all, when hasn’t one of their campaigns been applauded worldwide? We’d actually be curious to find out how much these brand new bottles cost them to make given all the ridicule.

Well, we suppose it’s like they say: there’s a first time for everything. And even this white winged dove will keep on singing. Just ask Stevie Nicks.

Good try, Dove. But maybe next time stick to promoting real women — and not mockups of women — instead.