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Love wine? You’re about to heart it even more. Ok we know, the debate about whether consuming a glass of vino is actually good for your health is an ongoing one, but according to new evidence we’re leaning towards uncorking that bottle after all — whether it’s red or white.

That’s right Riesling and Chardonnay lovers; it looks as though this might finally be your time to shine.

Cougar Town wine

A new study, which was conducted in the Czech Republic and was recently unveiled at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Barcelona, Spain, gave participants with a mild-to-moderate risk of cardiovascular disease both types of the spiked juice and found that after a year, both groups benefited from its effects. Drinking wine lowers your chance of heart disease? It almost sounds too good to be true.

It sure is. While wine proved effective at lowering LDL (bad cholesterol), only the participants who also worked out at least twice a week saw higher levels of HDL, the heart-attack fighting, good type of cholesterol. So in order to sip on that sweet, sweet glass at the end of the day, you’ve got to clock the hours at the gym first. But hey — finally an excuse to work out that everyone can get behind.

Of course, these studies usually come with a variety of factors. The subjects here stuck to “moderate” amounts of wine (one medium-sized glass per day for women and two for men), five days per week. The study didn’t mention whether those who worked out four times a week could drink twice as much, or whether all five of those glasses could be saved for the same day, but we sort of doubt it. Guess that means no oversized glasses for us.

Cougar Town wine Cougar Town wine

It’s also worth noting that the participants in this particular study stuck to two specific types of wine — pinot noir and chardonnay-pinot, rather than varying the types. We have a sneaking suspicion some of the fruitier white wines with higher sugar content don’t exactly count.

Still, those numbers are definitely something to raise a glass to. Cheers!

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