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Drinking while on vacation is a pretty common practice, especially if you’re going to an all-inclusive resort. CTV News reports that of the people they surveyed, 39 per cent admitted to being intoxicated at some point during their last vacation. (And those are the ones who admitted it.)

Take the case of Aggery Blair. Within 15 minutes of arriving at his all-inclusive hotel in Cuba, he slipped on the floor and broke his arm. He’d taken out full medical travel insurance before he left, and he thought he’d be able to file a claim for the medical bill, which came to around $700. To his surprise, the travel insurance company, Cumis, denied the claim because Blair had been drinking. He insists he only had one drink by the time of the accident, but Cumis is unwilling to discuss the case further, pending appeal.

Insurance can also be denied if you’re taking part in extreme sports, such as parasailing or zip-lining. Some policies even consider hiking extreme, so be sure to check it out before you book. The Loop closely examined several of Canada’s top travel-insurance policies (and read that pesky, almost non-navigable fine print) and the “alcohol” exclusion was listed in all of them. The exclusion language is vague, so even one drink could be grounds to deny a claim — hence Cumis’ response to Blair.

So if you plan on drinking while you’re vacationing — which is a lot of you — be sure to talk firsthand with your insurance provider for clarification. For more information, watch the video, above, and read the latest at the Government of Canada’s travel insurance advisory page.