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What’s the only thing better than travelling? Travelling and eating—and Globe and Mail columnist and National Geographic contributing editor Heather Greenwood Davis knows everything about Canada’s scrumptious food trails. 
From beer to butter tarts, the Great White North has a ton of tours that reveal the amazing cuisine diversity that stretches from coast to coast. All you need to do is pack your bags, grab a fork, and get ready to eat your way through Canada.
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Photo credit: Heather Greenwood Davis

NOVA SCOTIAN SEA FOOD

There are two main food trails in this province that offer 85 different culinary experiences. The Chowder trail is an annual event between May and October that, true to its name, gives travelers a taste of seafood chowder. The Lobster trail reveals locally-inspired dishes, with talented chefs using fresh lobster to make anything from poutine, tacos, and fondue! For both of these trails you can pick up a ‘passport’ and get stamps at each location, giving you a permanent reminder of the amazing adventures that you had on the way.  
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Photo credit: Tourism Nova Scotia

DRINKS IN CAPE BRETON

There isn’t a more fitting name for a drinks trail than The Good Cheer Trail! With over 50 locations in Nova Scotia, this experience lets you sample local craft brews, ciders and distilled products all throughout Cape Breton. Lasting approximately seven hours, leave the car keys behind and get ready to sample some quality food and drinks.
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Photo credit: Tourism PEI / Yvonne Duivenvoorden

PEI: CANADA’S FOOD ISLAND

This culinary trail offers six different options for touring the island depending on your personality and interests. For those who want to pick up some skills along the way, PEI offers ‘Authentic Experiences’ that leave participants with insight into the process and people behind the food. Dig for clams or spend the afternoon with a fisherman—the options are limitless on PEI’s food trails.
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Photo credit: Eastern Townships / TOURISME DU QUEBEC / Paul Villecourt

CHEESE IN QUEBEC

The Cheese Route in Quebec is an exciting one, and not just because of the amazing food. This experience actually allows participants to meet cheesemakers and learn about their production techniques and stories. Not only that, but bring a cooler and you might actually be able to bring some cheese home!
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Photo credit: Tourism Richmond

B.C. DUMPLINGS

With a huge Chinese population, incredibly authentic Asian food isn’t hard to find in British Columbia. The Dumpling trail highlights the best spots for this cuisine right here in Canada, and people flock to it every year. Grab your chopsticks and get ready for this amazing self-guided tour.
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Photo credit: Rocky Mountain Wine & Food Festival

MEAT AND POTATOES IN THE PRAIRIES

Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan all offer great regional cuisines that are a bit more meaty. Manitoba has The Homegrown trail, which features wild berries, pickerel, and bison as well as the ethnic eateries and food co-ops that all pride themselves on taking advantage of Manitoba produce. While in Alberta, time your visit with the Rocky Mountain Wine and Food festival for more delicious fun, and in Calgary, try the Testicle Festival to discover the many ways to enjoy a…wait for it.,,Prairie Oyster (a.k.a. bull testicle). 
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Photo courtesy: © 2018 Destination Ontario

ONTARIO EATS

Baked goods are especially popular in Ontario, and you don’t have to head far to find a tart trail. The Kawarthas Northumberland Butter Tart Tour takes you to more than 50 locations throughout Ontario, visiting local bakeries, cafes, and restaurants. The best part? It doesn’t have to be by car. A boat ride through the Trent-Severn waterway brings you by nearly a dozen bakeries, all within 1 km of mooring locations!