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Wednesday marks the final day of the Sussexes’ royal tour of Africa and it’s been quite a trip. Aside from Harry introducing one of his favourite places to Meghan, their goal as a team was to focus on women’s and girls’ rights, mental health, HIV and AIDS, the environment and climate change, and grassroots leadership. And they didn’t disappoint.

It was a visit months in the making and their respective passion and energy that they put into their work at home was equally matched in South Africa, Botswana, Angola and Malawi. In his first public appearance, Harry and Meghan’s son, Archie, charmed Archibishop Desmond Tutu and his daughter; Harry retraced his late mother, Diana’s footsteps as he continued her legacy to rid the world of landmines as well as tear down the stigma surrounding AIDS and HIV; and Meghan made her own mark, continuing to advocate for the rights of women and girls.

After being separated for five days (Meghan and Archie remained in South Africa where Meg embarked on some quiet but powerful engagements, while Harry ventured off solo to do work in Angola, Botswana and Malawi), the Sussexes reunited in Johannesburg where they are concluding their royal visit. The couple travelled to the nearby township of Tembisa and met with youth and entrepreneurs who are working to fight South Africa’s rising unemployment numbers. Harry and Meghan gave rousing speeches, where they spoke about their love of Africa, all the inspiring people they’ve met over the last 10 days and the issues that remain so important to them. “We will firmly stand up for what we believe,” said Harry, in words that could also apply to the epic legal action he and Meghan have taken against the Mail on Sunday. “We are fortunate enough to have a position that gives us amazing opportunities, and we want to do all we can to play our part in building a better world.”

Then Harry introduced Meghan, joking that unlike himself, she doesn’t require notes to speak.

The royal couple then met with Graça Machel, the widow of Nelson Mandela. It was Meghan’s first time meeting Machel but Harry had previously met her in 2015.

Harry and Meghan also attended a reception at the High Commissioner’s Residence where they met with British and South African investors as well as South African female entrepreneurs in creative industries, in anticipation to next year’s Africa Investment Summit, which will be hosted in the U.K.

Harry and Meghan will then finish off their royal tour with one last engagement: meeting with President Cyril Ramaphosa and his wife, Dr. Tshepo Motsepe. Then they will be back in England where they will continue to put the work in and fight the good fight. But knowing just how much love these two have for Africa, they’ll be back before we know it. Until next time.

 

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In Tembisa, Johannesburg, today The Duke and Duchess visited to meet young entrepreneurs at the YES hub – a hive for creativity and social enterprise. Their visit was an amazing tour of the ingenuity and opportunity – seeing businesses that varied from food to essential sanitary products for local women. During their visit, they were able to sample food from ‘Chef Mish’ – a local masterchef winner – which he makes at the site as part of his catering business and cafe. They then joined YES community members to take part in training and tests that will help them gain skills and find work. On the third stop today, entrepreneur Moss showed The Duke and Duchess the organic produce he’s growing in the township with aquaponics – supplying local restaurants. And finally, The Duke and Duchess met the women behind the amazing Blossom Care Solutions – who are making 80,000 sanitary pads every month for women in their community. They are 100% compostable, and provide an essential low-cost product for women and girls. The Duchess has long campaigned on this issue and wrote in Time magazine in 2017, saying: “In communities all over the globe, young girls’ potential is being squandered because we are too shy to talk about the most natural thing in the world. To that I say: we need to push the conversation, mobilize policy making surrounding menstrual health initiatives, support organizations who foster girls’ education from the ground up, and within our own homes, we need to rise above our puritanical bashfulness when it comes to talking about menstruation.” • See our previous post to see The Dukes speech #RoyalVisitSouthAfrica Photo ©️ PA images

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