Life Parenting
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There’s nothing more magical as a parent than coming downstairs after putting the kids to bed. You flop on the couch, grab your glass of wine and you’re ready to press play on the first of three episodes of How to Get Away With Murder you need to catch up on. And then you hear it. That awful, dreaded sound. The familiar creak from the floorboards above. Followed by the distinctive squeak of the door hinge you’ve been meaning to oil. Then the cries of your youngest calling out your name. You know, the one who should be asleep so you can finally narrow down your suspect list of who shot Annalise.

But, alas. It’s not to be. And every parent feels your pain. Or most parents. There are actually some who have kids that sleep through the night, damn them. Reed Verdesoto is not one of those parents. He has three daughters under the age of five so he basically hasn’t slept in, well, five years.

Instead of crying, or checking into a hotel for a toddler-less, dream-filled night, Verdesoto wrote a little song about his trials and tribulations from the last few years. All the after-bedtime excuses, he’s nailed them in the lyrics of his parody, “Shut Up and Go to Sleep,” a parody of Walk the Moon’s hit “Shut Up and Dance.”

You know how the chorus goes. Now substitute the actual lyrics with “No, don’t you dare get up, no you don’t have to pee. You said ‘I want a drink,’ I said ‘Shut up and go to sleep!’ These kids will be the death of me, ooooooo-ooooooh, ‘Shut up and go to sleep!”

Now you’ll never get it out of your head (Verdesoto’s version, not Walk the Moon’s). But, really. Why does bedtime have to be such a fight?