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There are some things on this planet that we can say with absolute certainty. Water is wet, all dogs deserve love and frozen things melt when left out in the sun. These are things we have always been sure of. Sorry folks, but our world was rocked a little this week when we found out about never-melting ice cream. Yeah, we’re uncomfortable too.

A Japanese company called Kanazawa Ice has figured out how to produce ice cream that remains intact even in the summer heat. The company came across the non-melting recipe by accident in a lab and the key is actually an all-natural ingredient: polyphenols extracted from strawberries. So you don’t have to worry about gross chemicals making your ice cream do the exact opposite of what it’s supposed to.

The company is known for their adorable never-melting popcicles. Just look at them. They’re so cute, they almost make you forget how strange it is they don’t melt.

We get that it’s supposed to be natural, but there’s something super weird about ice cream that doesn’t melt. Probably because in all other instances it means there are some crazy additives in there. Like earlier this week when an Australian grandmother noticed that an ice cream sandwich left out on her lawn didn’t melt in the sun. After four days. 

Now that looks exactly like the kind of sandwich we all ate as kids and feed to our children all summer. Mark us down as ‘extremely concerned.’

So what happened there? Are these cheap sandwiches also made with the secret Kanazawa Ice recipe? Nope. This is actually chemicals at work. As Consumer Reports explained when a similar story about Wal-Mart sandwiches went viral in 2014: ‘Manufacturers add gums and other ingredients like calcium sulfate and mono diglycerides to help control the melting rate of ice cream. They are also added to stop large crystal formations from forming when the products are taken in and out of the freezer.’ Check out the video below for their full explanation.

Natural or not, it’s a little freaky to see ice cream just sit there, unmoving, in the sun. Plus, you can just imagine the foamy taste of a melty-but-not-really-melting ice cream sandwich. How do we feel about this? Can our fragile society handle non-melting ice cream?