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Canada’s first female Prime Minister, The Right Honorable Kim Campbell, has had some golden moments on Twitter, but this week, she saw some quick backlash for comments she made about professional women wearing sleeveless dresses.

Campbell shared a link to an article breaking down the best way to dress when speaking publicly to make the most impact. The author sites a study that found the more clothing you have on, the more intelligent people perceive you to be. He expands on that point to mean, “the less clothing you have on, the dumber we’re going to take you to be” and suggests both men and women should wear high fashion clothing and women specifically should not wear sleeveless ensembles.

The article itself comes across as a little condescending, but Campbell shared it as proof of a long-held belief of hers that women — particularly newscasters — should keep their shoulders covered in the professional world. She writes, “I have always felt it was demeaning to the women and this suggests that I am right. Bare arms undermine credibility and gravitas!”

There was quick backlash from followers who defended a woman’s right to wear what she wants and sited Michelle Obama as a prime example of a powerful and intelligent woman who often goes sleeveless. Other female Canadian politicians had their own cheeky response to the former PM’s comments too. Calgary MP Michelle Remple tweeted that she believes in the right of Canadians to “bare arms” and then dropped the mic by sharing a video of herself addressing a similar issue in the House of Commons earlier this month. Kathleen Wynne posted a photo of herself speaking at an event in a sleeveless dress and also asserted her “right to bare arms” to which MP Catherine McKenna tweeted back “Me too.”

Campbell replied to a lot of the backlash by specifying that she meant bare arms undermine the credibility of women delivering the news specifically. She also had to combat a few commenters who took the low blow of posting a scandalous black and white photo of Campbell from 1993. She replied that she wasn’t reading the news and the photo was art.