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All new moms rejoice, you do not have to ”snap back” to your pre-baby bods after giving birth. While this should be a fact known to all humanity, when’s the last time you saw a post-partum mom in all her unedited glory? We’ll wait.

Well, UK brand Mothercare is mixing it up with their new ad campaign which features 10 images of beautiful, diverse mamas and their post-baby bodies.

“We are so delighted to be launching Body Proud Mums, our new campaign that celebrates the beauty of the post-birth body and represents a part of motherhood that is rarely portrayed in the media,” the company writes. Shown on the London transport billboards, the ads feature non-digitally altered photos of new moms and their beautiful babies. Also shown: c-section scars, stretch marks and stomachs that GASP, SHOCK, HORROR, don’t have abs. Personally, we find it refreshing to see photos of real women and what bodies can look like after pregnancy. Especially after being inundated with every kind of slimming tea, waist trainer and appetite suppressant lollipop out there via social media.

Still, the campaign has its detractors. As Jezebel points out, these pics also show us that these women are entitled to look the way they do (that is, not “conventionally attractive”) solely because they have babies. And you know what? Jezebel has a point. “These photos tell a righteous tale of maternal sacrifice, of women who let themselves go for the only reason women are ever supposed to let themselves go (and not just physically, either): motherhood.” Why should we let motherhood be the only acceptable reason for our bodies to be less than “perfect”? As if those without children should always be toned and taut because how dare they think they’ve earned the right to fat and stretch marks.

Nonetheless, Mothercare’s campaign isn’t the problem. It’s a step in the right direction towards recognizing that all bodies should be represented in media. Showcasing bodies that don’t look like Victoria’s Secret models shouldn’t be groundbreaking. It should be the norm–for all bodies.

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