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Hollywood is now living in a post-Weinstein era, which means steps are being taken to ensure that men and women in the industry can feel safe at work without the threat of sexual harassment and assault.

While the #MeToo movement was spurred by many high-profile actors coming forward to report their own stories of harassment and abuse at the hands of power players in the industry, assault can happen to people at any level of an organization. That’s why the new guidelines announced this week by the Producer’s Guild of America aim to protect all workers in Hollywood, regardless of where their name falls in the credits.

The first film to adopt the new guidelines was also announced this week and it couldn’t be more fitting. Director Patty Jenkins and actor Gal Gadot will be reteaming for the highly anticipated Wonder Woman 2, with the superhero flick taking its place as the first film made under the new Anti-Sexual Harassment Guidelines. Time for the lasso of truth to make movie sets a lot more honest and much safer.

The guidelines were announced on January 19 and include measures to be followed by those reporting sexual misconduct and those in the position to discipline, terminate and report the misconduct. Training will take place with cast and crew before shooting even begins, establishing a safe space for all those involved from day one.

The Producer’s Guild of America began working on the guidelines at the end of 2017, following the many complaints of assault lodged against Hollywood veterans like Harvey Weinstein, Kevin Spacey, Louis CK and Brett Ratner. Jenkins and Gadot were both vocal opponents of Brett Ratner. Although Jenkins and Gadot did not see the producer commit any sexual assault, they were deeply troubled by the number of actors who lobbied complaints against him, including Olivia Munn and Natasha Henstridge, and ended up having Ratner removed from Wonder Woman 2.

In case you wanted to know the future of movie making, here are the seven recommendations outlined by the Producer’s Guild of America for those dealing with sexual misconduct on set.

    1. First and foremost, all productions comply with federal and state laws regarding harassment.
    2. Each production, in whatever medium or budget level, provides in-person anti-sexual harassment (ASH) training for all members of the cast and crew, prior to the start of production and prior to every season of an ongoing production.
    3. Each production continue to be vigilant in efforts to prevent sexual harassment during the production process.
    4. Each production offer reporting procedures that provide a range of methods, multiple points-of contact, including contacts at different organizational levels and in different geographic workplaces (e.g., a TV series that shoots in New York but maintains a writers’ room in Los Angeles), if applicable.
    5. Reports of harassment are listened to with attention and empathy.
    6. Producers be alert for any possibility of retaliation against an employee who reports harassment and take steps to ensure that such retaliation does not occur.
    7. We recommend that producers conduct all meetings and/or casting sessions in an environment that is professional, safe and comfortable for all parties, and encourage others on the production to adhere to these same standards.

We’d have thought some of these would have been obvious, but if they need to be spelled out, so be it. Whatever it takes, we’re glad to see it.