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As technology advances, it becomes easier and faster to send photos across the cyberspace. Whether a photo is sent to a next-door neighbour or a friend across the globe, these files can be received in a nano-second. These photos can include quirky selfies or a group photo of your friends at a bar, but it’s become an unfortunate fate for young women that some of these pics include unsolicited and explicit images, as well.

Trust us—it’s more common than you might think.

According to The Guardian, four in 10 young women have reported being sent unsolicited explicit images of men genitalia in their lifetimes. This raises the question: Why? What is the motivating factor for men to send photographs of their genitals to unsuspecting women?

Because, let’s be real, no one wants to see those photos.

Receiving these unsolicited photos has now been coined “cyber-flashing” and has fuelled debate amongst members of Parliament and campaigners for a new law that targets these cyberflashers. And while new laws could be a good thing, existing applications—like Snapchat, which erase all evidence of these photographs in a matter of seconds—present a difficult framework for debaters.

Should it be against the law to send unsolicited explicit images? Is such a law even possible with today’s technology? One can only hope.