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Have you ever been duped by a box of frozen “burgers” that turn out to be veggie? Have you ever gawked at a package of “vegetarian bacon” and wondered aloud in the supermarket what it could possibly be made of? Well, you’re not alone and now it looks like France has had enough too. They’ve passed new legislation that prohibits companies from using meat words to describe products that aren’t of animal origin.

That means veggie “burgers,” meatless “bacon,” vegan “sausage” and cauliflower “steaks” are all off the table. In fact, brand a vegetarian product with a meaty word and you could be facing a hefty €300,000 ($470,000) fine. That’s quite the penalty for a little branding.

A French MP and farmer proposed the new legislation with the explanation that products with packaging that uses words commonly associated with meat is misleading for consumers. He tweeted his delight after the bill passed last week.

“It is important to combat false claims,” he wrote, “Our products must be designated correctly: the terms of #cheese or #steak will be reserved for products of animal origin.”

The ban will also cover vegan alternatives to dairy products that were formerly branded with dairy-style names. That means no more almond “milk” or vegan “cheese.” Last year, a ruling by a European Union court found that these non-dairy-dairy-named products were misleading and unacceptable but this puts the precedent into law (and adds a severe monetary deterrent).

Reactions to the new laws have been mixed. Some people are delighted that they will no longer have to puzzle over “steaks” that aren’t steak. There’s something to be said for making food labeling clear and informative.

Others – self-proclaimed vegetarians/vegans/animal rights advocates, in particular – were not happy about the change. There were some arguments that the law is a “rejection” of veganism. Then there were the much loftier arguments of “if you’re going to ban this type of branding, shouldn’t you also ban calling meat ‘humane.’” And now we’re having the vegetarian debate again. Cool.

The new French legislation is an interesting case study in the ethics of product labeling, but it also begs the question: were there seriously scores of people purchasing veggie alternatives assuming they were really meat?