Life Food
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

We’ve heard Germans love their beer, but this is next level. In a move that seems like something right out of a frat comedy, the Waken Open Air festival organizers have found the new best way to supply a festival with booze. Like any other precious liquid, transport it vast quantities of it through a pipeline. And beer-drinkers rejoice.

The heavy metal festival (yeah, no flower crowns here) has had difficulty keeping up with beer demand over the past few years with 75,000 people drinking 5.1 litres of beer each over the three days. Rather than cart in that many kegs (by our calculations, about 7,650 fifty-litre kegs) the organizers figured there had to be a better way. Obviously there is.

Installing these pipelines (which also include a waterline, but who cares?) will decrease traffic through the festival and main stage area (which will be safer and easier on the ground) and prove to be a lot less work. Work smarter, not harder, as they say.

Waken also advertises that there won’t be any more interruptions of service at their beer booths while bartenders change kegs. They certainly know their audience. These pipelines will be capable of pouring six beers in six seconds. That should give you an indication of what we’re dealing with here. It’s A LOT of beer.

The project is part of the festival’s new permanent infrastructure. The pipes are being installed 80 centimeters below the ground’s surface so that the fields can be used for crops at other times of the year without disturbing the pipes.

We’ve got to say, we’re a little surprised this is the first we’re hearing of something like this. Doesn’t that just seem like the best way to supply that much beer? We’ll probably be seeing other places employ similar techniques in the coming years. While permanent pipelines might not be practical everywhere, the Germans seem to be on to something here.