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Forget those faulty, easily damaged eyes you were born with — wouldn’t you rather have a faultless bionic lens that could allow you to see infinity? That’s right, see into infinity.

We can barely wrap our heads around it.

shocked kid

But that seems to be the case out in British Columbia, where optometrist Dr. Garth Webb has invented the Ocumetic Bionic Lens; with its creation, Webb says patients would have perfect vision, and that progressive and contact lenses would become obsolete.

“This is vision enhancement that the world has never seen before,” said Webb to The Vancouver Sun. The lens itself resembles a tiny button.

“If you can just barely see the clock at 10 feet, when you get the Bionic Lens you can see the clock at 30 feet away,” says Webb, who describes the simple implantation process: A lens is customized exactly for your eye, folded in a saline-filled syringe and then placed in the eye, where it unravels itself in under 10 seconds.

Available for people over the age of 25 (when your optical structures are fully developed and set), the painless procedure — identical to cataract surgery — takes about eight minutes, and a patient’s sight would be immediately corrected.

Speaking of cataracts, if you get these bionic lenses, you’re at no risk of developing them. Since your eye’s natural lens is organic, it inevitably decays; not so with the implanted one. It’s tough to find a downside to this innovation.

Believe it or not, the Bionic Lens may also render laser-correction surgery useless, too. Laser surgery sometimes results in side effects, like glare, poor night vision and cataracts, none of which are anticipated to occur in early analyses of the Bionic Lens.

Pending clinical trials on animals and blind human eyes, the Bionic Lens could be available in Canada in about two years, Webb says.

Dr. Webb, CEO of Ocumetics Technology Corp., has spent the better part of a decade and about $3 million researching and developing the Bionic Lens.