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Some holiday traditions are easier to participate in than others. Like wrapping presents, for example; even if it feels like you have two left hands and can’t fold paper to form a perfect corner for the life of you, you can always toss your presents into bags, fluff some tissue on top and call it a day. Merry Christmas, friend!

But spreading holiday cheer by building a gingerbread house requires next-level skill and patience. Suddenly, you’re expected to be a master at decorating treats with a degree in architectural engineering, specializing in crunchy cookie walls and sweet icing caulking.

Pinterest is probably partially to blame for making gingerbread houses look like an easy afternoon project. It’s all perfectly built roofs with swirls of icing on top and teensy jujube-covered doors. But the truth is, not everybody’s so good at it. And this year, folks are being a bit more honest about the final results of their cookie house construction.

Why has it taken so long for humanity to publicly admit that erecting walls of baked dough and getting them to stick together with icing sugar is actually really, really hard!?

If you’ve ever attempted to build a biscuit-based house, these gingerbread fail photos are probably pretty familiar.

Getting the first two walls to stick together is always a huge feat. You might feel like Martha Stewart and momentarily consider quitting your day job to start a full-time bakery out of your house. It would be adorable. Maybe you’ll get a television show one day, too?

But all hell breaks loose after those first two walls. The icing suddenly becomes less pliable. Can icing lose its stick!? Because it just did.

If you manage to get all four walls up, it’s normal to celebrate with a glass of wine or two. But that’s a terrible idea, because alcohol. And you’ve still got the roof to slap on.

The roof usually puts too much pressure on the foundation walls and eventually, everything begins to fold inwards. A collapse feels inevitable.

And if you get as far as decorating, just know that your finger will probably poke a hole through the cookie surface at some point, no matter how delicately you try to place that green and white swirly mint.

Oh well, you can still have a merry Christmas, even if it is a bit of a messy one.