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Gwyneth “Goopsy” Paltrow is at it again, and this time she’s recommending another procedure that could be fairly unsafe. It’s a non-surgical face lift, and promises no scarring or pain. It’s being called sugar threading, but its roots are from a cosmetic procedure of the past.

Before we get to the present, let’s take a crash course in the history of nipping and tucking:

Cosmetic surgery wasn’t always as advanced as it is today. While, yes, Cher Horowitz‘s fictional mother dying whilst undergoing routine liposuction in the ’90s may have seemed like a throwaway joke, it wasn’t.

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By 1997, it was discovered that approximately 1 in 5,000 lipoplasties resulted in fatalities. So, self-improvement wasn’t and isn’t devoid of risks, especially when surgery is involved. But it’s also risky even if there is no surgery at all.

In 2005, “thread lifts” became a new procedure that promised non-invasive face lifts with minimal-to-no recovery time. No scalpel, just a needle and thread. Basically, the thread would go beneath the skin’s surface, and pull and position skin to reduce sagging – at least, that was the aim. By 2009, studies showed that the procedure didn’t show any long-lasting results, and patients reported showing no real signs of improvement. There were also instances of dimpling, visible knots (yikes) and some patients even had to get the threads removed.”Thread lifts” and “sugar threading” promise exactly the same outcomes with the same procedure, so why is Gwynny suggesting we try it?

Brittney Gif boss asks why

Well, the doctors GOOP discovered, Dr. Maurice Dray (Europe) and Dr. Woffles Wu (Singapore), say the threads are made from a dissolve-able sugar and don’t require knotting. And that dissolve-able sugar thread is said to produce outcomes that last for up to two years. Previously, in the mid-oughts, barbed sutures were used, which were routinely placed superficially and needed to be knotted. Still, there is currently no thread sugaring method approved in North America, so in order to do as Goop does, you’d have to fly to London, Paris or Singapore. And even then, there’s no certainty that it will work for you. In Canada, one doctor offers a similar practice called “feather lifting,” but procedures cost between $4,000 to $8,000 and he simply uses regular sutures.

Dr. Wu goes so far as to say there are practically no side effects with sugar threading, except for subtle bruising. “There can be slight bruising for a few days,” he says. “But nothing that cannot be hidden with some makeup or a scarf.”  For just the neck, the procedure will cost $2,453 dollars.