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In a world viewed through Snapchat and Instagram filters, it’s no surprise that apps everywhere are aiming to tweak and adjust our faces into comely symmetrical perfection. A nip here, a tuck there and bam, we’re all Kendall Jenner. Normally, we don’t bat an eye at the strange way society promotes homogeneous beauty, but what if the model for this app was a young child?

Enter Dim Dim Sum’s app, “Slim Booth“—the app that promises “a slimmer face and bigger eyes.” The app, which says it “saves money and time” by offering itself up as an alternative to plastic surgery, wants you to “share these pretty photos with your family, and friends via email, MMS, Facebook and Twitter and give them a surprise!”

Its poster girl? A young blonde haired girl who can’t be more than 10 years old.

Why this Hong Kong based mobile app company thought it’d be cool to use a child’s face as their test subject is beyond us, but it couldn’t come at a worse time.

Experts say that due to social media, children are now growing up with more anxiety and less self esteem. “Girls are socialized more to compare themselves to other people, girls in particular, to develop their identities,” says clinical psychologist Dr. Steiner-Adair to the Child Mind Institute. Normally, parents would be concerned with the unattainable ideals of Photoshopped models, actors and singers in magazines and on billboards. Now, the kid next door might be retouched too.

With all these images available at the touch of a smart phone, it’s no surprise why some young girls would want to alter their appearances to fit a more conventional definition of beauty.

Plastic Doctor, Abs Booth, FaceTune
Plastic Doctor/Abs Booth/FaceTune

Nothing about Slim Booth is particularly groundbreaking–there are hundreds of slimming and retouching apps in the app store alone (Abs Booth, Plastic Doctor, and the ever popular FaceTune to name a few). However, using a child’s face to promote an app that changes your features and promises a “more beautiful” appearance is pretty careless.

While we’re not against changing your looks (you do you), maybe at least leave it until we’re at the age where Santa and the Tooth Fairy aren’t real anymore.