Entertainment Celebrity
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

If you’ve been at all invested in Meghan and Harry’s Royal Oceania tour, you know that this thing has been full-on Baby Watch for 16 straight days and we’ve been totally loving it. The couple’s last day brought arguably the sweetest “look at how these two will be as parents” moment yet when they visited the Rainbow Springs Nature Park in Rotorua to check out the kiwi bird breeding program.

Aren’t they adorable? The couple gave the tiny birds names in Māori – the language of the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand – “Koha” meaning “gift” and “Tihei” meaning “sneeze.” It’s a long shot, but we have to say, these two are showing their cards early as A+ namers of small living creatures. Hmmm, wonder when they might use that very specific skill?

New Zealand’s national bird has become increasingly more endangered in recent years and these two new additions (as well as one chick that hatched while the Royals were at the centre) are part of conservationists’ breeding program to bolster the population again.

Before Harry and Meghan were meeting the future of the kiwi, the Royals participated in a traditional pōwhiri (a Māori welcoming ceremony) with singing, dancing and the Māori hongi greeting where two people press their noses together. The couple were given formal cloaks called Korowai to wear during the event and Meghan also added her own nod to the Māori culture – a necklace featuring a large jade stone called Pounamu which has spiritual significance. The necklace was designed by Māori fashion and jewellery designer Kiri Nathan.

After the ceremony, the couple were treated to a private lunch. Meghan reportedly asked specifically to speak with the ladies who were making the meal and offered to cook with them. It’s not the first time the Duchess has rolled up her sleeves at a Royal event. She co-authored a cookbook with the women affected by the Grenfell fire earlier this year. At the book’s launch, she and the ladies cooked traditional recipes together.

Later in the day, the Duke and Duchess gave their last walkabout of the tour to meet with their admirers in the streets of Rotorua. The Sussexes were given small gifts and doled out big hugs.

After a quick wardrobe change, the Royals capped off the day at the Redwoods Treewalk Rotorua -- a 700m-long walkway of suspension bridges between 117-year-old Redwood trees. The Duke and Duchess walked around and took in the view from both the ground and high up in the trees.

For anyone requiring one last Harry/Meghan moment from the tour to solidify their love in your memory forever, they finished their forest walk with a casual hand-held stroll past photographers.

Looks like that’s a wrap. The couple will fly back to London Thursday morning for what we can assume is some much needed R&R.