Life Food
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

With a New Year brings new food fads to help keep us on track with those healthy resolutions we made earlier this month, but which top trends are actually worth biting in to? Holistic nutritionist Kim D’Eon dishes on her favourite trends below.

Oat milk, or milk alternatives

We’ve seen a rise of milk alternatives over the years especially with the rise in veganism. Oat milk is another alternative to add to your list. The consistency of oat milk is more similar to cow’s milk than other non-dairy options and boasts more protein and fibre as well. Also good news for those with allergies to dairy, nuts or soy this up-and-coming trend is a great alternative!

Faux meat snacks

Gaining popularity is faux meat snacks, foods like jackfruit or mushrooms disguised as a treat that is most commonly made of meat! Things like beef jerky and pulled pork sandwiches are getting a new twist. Unlike some meat-free products such as soy-based foods like tofurkey and veggie burgers, things like jackfruit are whole foods and minimally processed which is a plus when looking for healthy meat-free alternatives!

Marine munchies

Yes, you read that right—but it’s probably not what you’re thinking. We’re talking about kelp! There’s been an upswing of people embracing the tastes of the ocean this year, but that doesn’t necessarily have to include fish. Things like kelp can be made into noodles for an alternative to grain-based pastas, add a little bit of vegan toona in there and you’ve got yourself a great fish-friendly dish!

Seed butters

Thinking about nut allergies and nut butter restrictions, especially within schools, this trend is going to be huge with parents who have school-aged children. Seed butter is a rising trend and a nut butter alternative that will have parents saying “YAS!” Depending on what type of seed butter you prefer each spread has its own unique nutritional benefits: sunflower seeds (high in magnesium), pumpkin seeds (high in zinc) or tahini which is made from sesame seeds and is loaded with calcium.