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You can get almost anything on Amazon: electronics, clothes, toys, books and home furnishings. Heck, you can even binge-watch TV shows through their streaming service. And now, the shipping company is acquiring Whole Foods, so it looks like you’re going to be able to get fancy groceries delivered right to your door in the near future too.

And that’s a pretty big deal for Canadians and Americans alike, because it means the whole grocery game is about to change. Let’s break down exactly what this means for you, shall we?

Large chains are going to have to get creative

In Canada, there are only a few options when it comes to buying groceries online. You can do so through Grocery Gateway for a large fee, or through certain large-chain stores… with a minimum order of $50 in most cases (we’re looking at you, Walmart). Now that fresh groceries are going to be made available through Amazon, other major grocery retailers are going to have to look at new delivery options to meet that same consumer demand. After all, no one likes long grocery store checkouts on the weekend — especially when you’re stuck behind another nickel-counting person who insists on price-matching every other item.

We could get Whole Foods quality food for a heck of a lot less

Everyone knows that you only shop at Whole Foods when you want to feel rich. And sure, it’s an experience. Between the live music, the cooking demonstrations, the pretty stacks of fruits and veggies and the make-your-own nut butter station, Whole Foods is a pretty epic (and expensive) place to shop. But when you take away all of those extras, suddenly the cost of buying these organic, whole foods drops. That seems to be one of the goals with Amazon’s distribution model, and it’s one that could translate into a heck of a lot of savings for us.

Other stores’ prices may drop

The best part about Amazon potentially offering low-cost groceries online? It’s that the other retailers we currently frequent are going to have to drop their prices in order to stay in the game. There are already plenty of stores doing the whole price-match guarantee, so it will be interesting to see whether they take Amazon’s pricing into account when honouring that deal.

The whole shopping experience is going to change completely

Not getting stuck in a line on a busy weekend is just one benefit. Thanks to this Amazon-Whole Foods deal, we’re going to have access to so many food products that we didn’t previously have access too. Even though Whole Foods has a few retail locations in Canada (there are 13 all together) it isn’t exactly accessible to all Canadians. Now, the entire country will be able to peruse a wide variety of good-for-you and unique brands that aren’t typically available at other grocers.

We’ll probably use Amazon more than we already do

Amazon has made it pretty darn easy to get things with the touch of a button (everyone who did Christmas shopping through the retailer last year raise your hand). So while you’ll probably continue popping into the store for a last-minute dinner item or milk if you’re running low, it probably won’t take long to become addicted to getting your groceries delivered through them too. This model already works in the States, after all, and we’ve been enjoying non-perishable items through the retailer since 2013. This latest, $13.7 billion USD (or $18 billion CAD) move was only a matter of time.