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It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. After 675 days of investigating, more than 2,800 subpoenas, 500 witnesses and charges against 37 people and companies, Special Counsel Robert Mueller submitted his final report on interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election — AKA “The Russia Investigation” — on Friday. Over the weekend, U.S. Attorney General William Barr reviewed the report and released a letter to congress and the public Sunday evening with some preliminary conclusions.

Before we get any further, it’s important to note that very few people have actually seen the Mueller report and NONE of the document (save for limited quotes in the Barr letter) is public. Everything we know about what’s inside the report is from Barr’s summary. Everything else is speculation.

Not an indictment for Trump

The biggest question everyone wanted answered from the report was DID DONALD TRUMP COLLUDE WITH RUSSIA? Stated more eloquently, people wanted to know if the Donald Trump presidential campaign had conspired with members of the Russian government to sway the 2016 election in his favour through a coordinated effort.

“[T]he investigation did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities,” Barr quotes the report as saying. It was proven back in 2016 that the Russian government interfered in the election, the remaining question was just if Trump’s campaign knew or participated in the action.

But not an exoneration either

Before Trump supporters start leaping for joy, the report also covers the subject of obstruction of justice which doesn’t leave him looking so squeaky clean. You’ll recall there are a number of questions about whether certain firings and statements to law enforcement officials (most notably, former FBI director James Comey) made by Trump could have constituted obstruction of justice (even if there was no collusion). On that point, Mueller doesn’t seem to be offering much.

“The Special Counsel… did not draw a conclusion — one way or another — as to whether the examined conduct constituted obstruction,” Barr wrote. “Instead, for each of the relevant actions investigated, the report sets out evidence on both sides of the question.”

Barr then quotes directly from the report again:

“While this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.”

Meaning, while there isn’t enough evidence to convict him beyond a reasonable doubt by the definition of the law, there is some evidence that could suggest obstruction.

But that didn’t stop the prez from reading it that way

In the most on brand move ever, Donald Trump read Barr’s letter and immediately used the very word Mueller said he wouldn’t use to describe the situation. POTUS tweeted Sunday that the report was a “Complete and Total EXONERATION.”

Which is just incorrect.

“Not sufficient to establish” obstruction

Since the Mueller report didn’t make a determination one way or another about whether Trump’s actions obstructed justice, Barr notes that the decision whether the conduct constitutes a crime is left up to him.

“Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and I have concluded that the evidence developed during the Special Counsel’s investigation is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offence,” Barr wrote.

He added that the determination was made divorced from the argument about whether it is possible to indict a sitting president.

Russia thinks it’s off the hook

As mentioned, it was already public knowledge that Russia interfered in the 2016 election. According to Barr, Mueller’s report reiterates that and outlines the “two main Russian efforts” to influence the democratic proceedings. The first was the “disinformation and social media operations in the United States designed to sow social discord” and the second was an effort “to conduct computer hacking operations designed to gather and disseminate information to influence the election” — that’s where Wikileaks and Hillary Clinton Campaign chair John Podesta‘s emails come into play.

Russia seems to have misinterpreted this part of Mueller’s findings. They latched onto the part that says there was no coordination between the government and Trump, completely missing the part where Russia definitely interfered.

“So Mueller’s long-awaited report proved what was known in Russia from the very beginning,” a Russian senator said. Confusing.

So, when do we get to see the whole thing?

That’s up to the AG. Barr says he’s “mindful of the public interest in this matter” and that his “goal and intent is to release as much of the Special Counsel’s report as [he] can consistent with applicable laws, regulations,  and Department policies.”

Barr says he is currently working to identify what parts of the report are confidential and which parts can be released. Despite his promise to publish what he can, Democrats are calling for the entire report to be released to the American people (we would add that releasing it to the Canadian people would be cool too).

As of this moment, that’s all we know, folks!