Life You
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

In this competitive job market, we’ve all lied on our resumes at some point or another.

But it turns a lot of the time, we’re getting caught whether we realize it or not. According to a recent survey from Career Builder, almost half of employers say they’ve caught a lie on an applicant’s resume. So is the solution to lie more effectively or just stick with the good ol’ honest truth?

The word from CTV’s Chief Financial Commentator Pattie Lovett-Reid? Tell the truth.

“The resume needs to be accurate, where you get to shine is the one-on-one,” she says in the video above, citing that most employers don’t even spend 60 seconds looking at a prospective resume before making a decision. Many things people lie about are also easily verifyable with one quick call to your references or education institution. Nonetheless, the Career Builder report found these are the things most people lie about:

  • 58 per cent of people embellish their skillset
  • 53 per cent embellish their responsibilities at work
  • 32 per cent tweak or change their job titles
  • 20 per cent lie about awards they’ve received or the duration of time they’ve worked with a certain employer

Of course, within those categories the lies can range from little white ones to glaring deceit. But with the job market as competitive as it is, what can you do to make yourself stand out without bending the truth a little?

“It’s not going to ever be about the resume,” Reid said. “If you actually get to the interview stage and you want to distinguish yourself from everyone else, say this to them: ‘I really want this job.’ People forget to say that, and after you say I really want this job, tell them no one is going to work harder for you than I will.”

It might seem like an obvious point, but when’s the last time you actually said that during an interview? For more tips, check out the video above.