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Regardless of how you voted last night, there’s a lot of reasons you should walk away feeling good about Canada’s 42nd election.

Remember how all of your friends were posting vote-themed updates on social media? It turns out they might’ve actually gotten through to people. Preliminary figures from Elections Canada reveal that just more than 68 per cent of eligible voters cast a ballot, up from only 61 per cent in 2011. That’s the highest Canada’s seen since 1993!

Making up the top three places on our electoral podium are Prince Edward Island at 77.4 per cent, trailed by the Yukon at 76 per cent and New Brunswick at 74.6 per cent. Although the figures don’t include those who registered on election day.

Even groups that generally vote in record low numbers, voted in this election. Just take students and Aboriginals, for example. While all the numbers haven’t yet been released, Rajean Hoilett, chairman of the Canadian Federation of Students in Ontario, told the CBC that a pilot project to get younger people voting was “incredibly successful” this year. There are also reports of ballots running out at the Siksika First Nation, the Onigaming First Nation and the Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, according to the public broadcaster.

As for the makeup of who Canadians actually voted in, there’s some good news on that front as well. The share of visible minorities in the House of Commons rose just shy of 4 per cent, while the country added about two per cent more women. But keep in mind that number can be misleading because the total number of seats in the house has increased since 2011, so Canada actually added 14 new female MPs to parliament.

So even if you aren’t necessarily happy with the result, you should be proud of Canada’s democracy today. We just got a little bit closer to actually putting the people in charge. For more on how Canada voted, check out the videos below: