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The next time you see an H&M swimwear ad, take a closer look. You may notice that things are a little different, more raw and natural than most ads. That’s because the clothing giant has vowed to stop airbrushing its bikini models. Three cheers for Photoshop-free models!

H&M will no longer digitally remove things like arm hairs, stretch marks, moles or scars from its models. Instead, bodies will be published exactly how they looked the day they were photographed on set. The brand’s latest swimwear collection is currently live on its website, and you can see the new mandate in action — stretchmarks on some models, moles on another. It’s glorious and refreshing and, honestly, about time. Instead of Photoshopped mannequins, the models look like regular, healthy women that you might spot lounging on the beach.

It’s a move that more and more brands are beginning to make. Asos, Aerie and Missguided have all gotten onboard with the anti-airbrush movement, and have been giving their consumers exactly what they want — real, honest models who look like actual humans and not overly smooth, alien-like creatures.

It’s a surprising move for H&M considering its questionable Photoshop kerfuffle in 2011 where it admitted to using completely computer generated bodies to sell its swimwear. If you were trying to give your consumers a complex, it almost worked, H&M, but these latest Photoshop-free images are a step in the right direction for sure.

Women took to Twitter to praise the brand for its latest campaign.

While this is a minor win (really, why were we ever Photoshopping arm hair and stretchmarks and freckles in the first place!?), ads that celebrate real women and their bodies are something consumers should expect to see more of. We don’t want to push our luck, but next time, could we have models with a variety of body shapes and sizes, H&M?