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Brie Larson is taking a page out of Ellen Pompeo’s book and doing the work to be an ally and advocate for the people who are systematically disadvantaged in the entertainment news industry. In a recent interview with Marie Claire, Larson shared that she’s using her Captain Marvel press tour to force outlets to send more diverse journalists to interview her.

“About a year ago, I started paying attention to what my press days looked like and the critics reviewing movies, and noticed it appeared to be overwhelmingly white male,” she said. “Moving forward, I decided to make sure my press days were more inclusive.”

Larson was speaking to writer, author and disability rights advocate Keah Brown for the magazine. Brown is a woman of colour who was born with cerebral palsy and has been vocal about her experience in an industry where odds are almost always stacked against her. She’s also the creator of the #DisabledAndCute hashtag (which turns two this week).

In the interview, Brown expressed how important it was to her for Larson to choose to speak to her.

“I was thrilled you requested me to interview you. I thought, ‘This is game-changing’. It’s the biggest opportunity I’ve had,” she told Larson. “Nobody usually wants to take a chance on a disabled journalist.”

Brie answered that since becoming aware of the obstacles faced by people of colour and with disabilities in news rooms and at entertainment outlets, she decided to use her celebrity profile to do something about it.

“After speaking with [Brown], the film critic Valerie Complex and a few other women of colour, it sounded like across the board they weren’t getting the same opportunities as others,” Larson said. “When I talked to the facilities that weren’t providing it, they all had different excuses.

“I want to go out of my way to connect the dots. It just took me using the power that I’ve been given now as Captain Marvel,” she continued. “[The role] comes with all these privileges and powers that make me feel uncomfortable because I don’t really need them.”

But she can use them for good. Which is exactly what she’s doing.

“I’ve never craved the spotlight that often comes along with success in this business. It’s a by-product of the profession and a sign of the times,” she said. “But any uncomfortableness I feel is balanced by the knowledge that it gives me the ability to advocate for myself and others.”

Take note, Hollywood!

Also, if you want a crash course in who Keah Brown is and why she’s kind of the best, she laid it all out for the Twitter trolls.