Life Travel
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

If you’re a frequent traveler between Toronto and Montreal, you’ve likely experienced the pains of a six-hour bus ride or the dreaded airport rigmarole that takes longer than the flight itself. Allow us to introduce Hyperloop by TransPod–your potential 30-minute solution.

Hyperloop is a land-based travel system that uses transport pods to move through vacuum-powered tubes. And while it would have a positive environmental impact by using renewable energies, Hyperloop’s biggest draw would be its extreme high speed.

The transit line boasts speeds of up to 1,200 km/h, making travel between major cities a breeze. The trip between Toronto and Montreal, for example, would not only be less of a hassle than traditional modes of transportation, but could also shave hours off the trip. At 1,000 km/h, the Toronto-Montreal route would take a mere 30 minutes. Think waking up in your apartment in Liberty Village, and brunching in Vieux-Montreal later that morning. Unreal.

Founder and CEO of TransPod, Sebastien Gendron, is presenting the Toronto-based company’s plans at InnoTrans in Berlin this week. With any success at this transportation trade show, Hyperloop will be one step closer to becoming a reality.

“We’ve been living with cars, trains and airplanes and boats for quite a long time now. So let’s move on and propose something new for the next century,” Gendron recently told CBC.

Train Interior
TransPod Inc.

And while Canadians aren’t always risk-takers when it comes to technology, developing Hyperloop might actually be less revolutionary than you’d initially assume. In fact, the technology already exists.

“Some have been developed for the aerospace industry, some for the rail industry,” said Gendron. “So it’s really a matter of putting everything together and [building] it and [getting] it approved by agencies like Transport Canada.”

Despite the attention that TransPod is getting, there’s still significant research and developmental planning that needs to take place before putting the transit system into action. According to Gendron, 2025 would be the earliest that infrastructure could be built and running–if everything goes to plan until then.

In other words, don’t start planning your cross-province brunch dates just yet.