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Microsoft Paint was pretty much the only way to make artwork on a computer back in the day. And yesterday morning, The Guardian pointed out that the 32-year-old digital drawing program had landed on Microsoft’s “deprecated” list for the upcoming update in the Fall. In other words, the program was to be removed from any new products.

The internet was sad — so sad. Because Microsoft Paint looked like a goner for sure.

Microsoft has been making a big push towards 3D drawing, and therefore didn’t seem to think people would miss the decades-old program. Not to mention, it’s hard to compete with the big boys, like Photoshop.

But gosh were those tech execs wrong. The internet went into a fury, musing over memories of good times spent (err, wasted?) with the program.


Others, including news outlets, mourned the loss by uploading R.I.P. photos.


A petition to save Paint called “Don’t Kill Microsoft Paint” was even started on Change.org. “If they only knew the childhoods they’d impacted with Paint, and the fun people have had with the humble utility,” the petition reads.

And after an agonizing day, Microsoft broke its silence with a blog post.

“Today, we’ve seen an incredible outpouring of support and nostalgia around MS Paint,” wrote Megan Saunders, the general manager of Microsoft’s 3D for Everyone Initiative. “If there’s anything we learned, it’s that after 32 years, MS Paint has a lot of fans. It’s been amazing to see so much love for our trusty old app.”

The main message from Saunders’ post is that Paint hasn’t been given the kiss of digital death! Instead, the program will just be given a new home in the Windows Store, where users can download it for free. It just won’t be automatically installed to every desktop like it used to be.

So what’s the lesson here? Well, apparently there are loads of people out there who still rely on Paint. And also, mass complaining goes a long way.

Long live Microsoft Paint!