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It all started on a late October day, when a woman named Reign Murphy stumbled upon a Christmas sweater in a Target. She instantly became upset – not because October 25 is too early for Christmas stuff, but because the sweater turned a mental illness into a holiday tagline.

The shirt reads OCD: Obsessive Christmas Disorder. This obviously proved irksome to those who actually suffer from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, since their condition isn’t something that spontaneously occurs at the sight of snow and popcorn garland. “OCD” doesn’t just mean “tidy,” although you might think it does, since many use the term as an adjective with abandon. People with OCD have compulsions and obsessions they can’t live without. These things – like hand-washing to ward off germs – cause distress. They’re all-consuming practices, and not doing them presents intense anxiety. Saying “I’m so OCD” when referring to having a clean house is not the same thing. If you can skip having a clean house, or take an off day from washing your hands 30 times, then you’re not among the afflicted. You’re just anal. It’s this flippant usage of the term that has gotten people upset.

Like this guy

 

Or this woman

Some people didn’t understand the logic behind the sweater

 

Others felt it trivialized their situation

Doctors began chiming in

 

As did OCD foundations

Meanwhile, some sufferers didn’t see the big deal

 

Despite the backlash, Target currently has no plans to remove the shirt from its stores. “We never want to disappoint our guests and we apologize for any discomfort,” Target spokesperson Jessica Carlson said. “We currently do not have plans to remove the sweater.”