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When it comes to fashion, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Or something like that. But when it comes to wearable trends as featured on runways that are showcased six months in advance, it turns out that people are getting a little confused.

It’s easy to see why fashion has become so, er, challenging. Designers don’t just make two collections a year anymore — they make fall menswear, spring couture, spring bridal, fall ready-to-wear, fall couture, spring menswear, resort, fall bridal, pre-fall and on and on. But the bottom line, according to the people behind one of the biggest fashion weeks around — New York Fashion Week — is that “something” needs to be done to get the people more involved. And shows as they stand, they admit, are no longer working for the general public.

According to the powers that be (as in, the Council of Fashion Designers of America), that “something” could be to open up the doors to the highly industrialized event and showcase fashions that are immediately wearable. As in, a consumer could go to a show and walk out with a new outfit that they’ve just seen on the runway, and not wait six months for a version of those pieces to hit the stores. No more waiting, just instant gratification.

As for those die-hard fashionistas who still want to preview collections in order to piece together their own idea of what the fashion-forward future will look like? Well they’ll have their shot at industry showcases, which would take place at the same time, via smaller shows or appointments.

This consumer-industry split — should it happen — wouldn’t be a completely new concept, although some feel it should be more widely utilized. Toronto’s Fashion Week has included this consumer-industry split for years, wherein non-industry guests can pay for the opportunity to see pre-season garb, some of which will not even get made. Should NYFW make the change it has in mind, it could open up the door to the future of fashion. With its new idea, what you see is literally what you get.

For now, the council is exploring all options, and has commissioned the Boston Consulting Group to pursue a study on the future of these shows. That won’t go down until after the holidays, and should take at least seven weeks.

So if you’re looking to get in on this potential change, you’ll have to wait until the February season at the earliest. In the meantime, we recommend good old-fashioned online shopping and look-books.