Life Food
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

Everyone loves pizza. That melt-in-your-mouth cheese and tangy tomato sauce mixture’s so good that it’s embedded into the core of our food culture. How is it that something so lovable can bring so much shame when eaten the “wrong” way?

Whether we’re afraid to get our fingers greasy or just super polite because of our inherent, Canadian habits, some of us do in fact use cutlery to slice up our pizza.

Yet, as soon as you stick a fork in a piece of pizza, that innocent gesture suddenly becomes taboo. This is a classic case of a favourite food that’s been tragically complicated by social etiquette.

Is it really so unethical to use a fork and knife to cut up your pizza and avoid the dreaded mess? A whole bunch of Matthew Lewis fans seem to think so.

On Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch last weekend, the Neville Longbottom actor was shamed over social media just for eating his pizza with a fork and knife. One tweet even accuses him of “disrespecting pizza.”

Was this simply a man trying to eat his pizza without making a mess or did Matthew Lewis actually manage to insult pizza?

On one hand, we like to be clean and non-messy eaters in public. But then again… it’s pizza. We’ve been brought up in a place where people practically toss it to one another at every single birthday party and post-diet known to man.

Sure, most people use their hands to eat pizza, so using cutlery may seem a little unnatural, but does that mean that Matthew really deserves to be criticized for eating in his own, special way? Does anybody really deserve that at all? Or maybe being polite and clean isn’t enough of a reason to defy tradition.

If we spend any more time trying to label pizza and cutlery as a no or a go, our brains may just implode. Instead, we want to give you the power to decide if there’s a right or a wrong way to eat pizza: