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It’s hard to know where the line is when it comes to joking about sensitive material. For politically-engaged comedians (and who isn’t these days?), it can be a challenge to joke about serious topics without offending the majority of your audience. It’s the test of a good comedian. This weekend, James Corden failed that test.

Corden hosted the amfAR Inspiration Gala Friday night, which honored Julia Roberts for her lifetime contributions to the Foundation for AIDS Research. In his opening monologue, Corden addressed the Harvey Weinstein scandal, but his insensitive jokes were not received well.

‘Tonight here in L.A. it’s so beautiful, Harvey Weinstein has already asked Tonight up to his hotel to give him a massage,’ he opened, referring to the common report among women harassed by Weinstein that he invited them to his hotel and would request massages. When he was met with disapproving groans from the audience, Corden doubled down.

‘I don’t know if that groan was that you liked that joke or that you don’t like that joke. If you don’t like that joke, you should probably leave now.’ He went on to joke about Weinstein forcing women to watch him ‘in hot water’ as the audience grew increasingly uncomfortable. Many took to social media to express their disappointment at the host’s choice of material.

The jokes weren’t edgy in the way Corden probably intended. As writer Jack Bernhardt pointed out: ‘he punched down, not up.’ Instead of backing up the victims who have come forward (and those who haven’t), Corden poked fun at the whole situation. His jokes weren’t really at Weinstein’s expense; he made fun of the stories the victims were telling. Where many comedians condemned and roasted the disgraced Hollywood mogul, Corden didn’t do either. He also didn’t call out the system and culture that allowed Weinstein to get away with serial sexual assault for decades. If you’re not going to do any of that, don’t talk about it at all.

After a weekend of backlash, Corden issued an apology for his indiscretion on Twitter. To many, the apology was made too late and seemed half-hearted.

For a look at commentary on the Weinstein situation done right, check out Seth Meyer’s ‘Closer Look’ segment on the topic where he addresses and calls out the scandal for what it is: systemic misogyny.