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If you don’t love James Corden, you must be confused about who he is. He’s that hilarious guy on the Late Late Show who rides around singing with celebrities. You know the one. Even the First Lady of the United States loves him. He’s funny, genuine, one of the nicest comedians out there and he’s just given us a reason to love him even more.

Corden is always quick with a political joke or eager to comment on a hot social topic in his nightly monologue, but it’s not often he speaks seriously or candidly about issues. He had one of those rare moments in an interview with Rolling Stone that was released this week. Corden talked earnestly about the body-shaming that happens in romantic comedies wherein love is reserved for the thin and conventionally beautiful.

He said, ‘I could never understand when I watch romantic comedies the notion that for some reason unattractive or heavy people don’t fall in love. If they do, it’s in some odd, kooky, roundabout way.’  His beef is with the fact that movies represent people differently based on their body type and appearance which isn’t consistent with real life at all.

He went on to assure everyone that falling in love is not something exclusive to perfect movie stars. He tells Rolling Stone, ‘[falling in love] is exactly the same. I met my wife; she barely owned a television and worked for Save the Children. We sat down one night and we fell in love and that was it.’ No ‘kooky, roundabout’ love for Corden, just classic rom-com.

James Corden and wife
Getty Images

His criticism of Hollywood’s representation is similar to that of his friend, Michelle Obama and countless others. Why can’t we just reflect the real world in TV and movies so we can all stop feeling bad about how we look? Not that our confidence should be derived from how much we look like the people on television, but it’s a little disappointing to never see a person who looks like you on a screen.

Corden also talked about how body-shaming can be a life-long issue for some people. It certainly shaped his life (although in an overcoming-bullying way).

‘You’re going to be a target. If you go to school and you’re me, you go, Right, I’m just going to make myself a bigger target. My confidence, it will terrify them.’ That’s how I felt in school.’ He said, ‘Inside, you’re terrified. But if you’re a bit funny, if you’re quicker than them, they won’t circle back on you again.’

His interview may not have been the barrel of laughs we usually get from Corden, but his honesty and calling-out of the media makes us love him even more. The stars have spoken, Hollywood. Where are the movies that reflect the population? We’d like to see them.