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There is nothing we love more than singing the praises of strong women and listening to them spit straight wisdom at us from a life well-lived (it’s a very specific love). This month, six such strong women are gracing Variety‘s “Power of Women” issue with some fire glossy cover shots and even fierier insights into how to make the most of our time on this planet.

The cover features  Jennifer Aniston, Mariah Carey, Awkwafina, Brie Larson, Chaka Khan and Disney Television Studios chairman Dana Walden. Not only do these women share the causes that are closest to their hearts (you know, using their powers for good) but they drop some knowledge along the way that we’re more than eager to eat up.

In their individual profiles, each woman gets into her personal form of activism—Jen and Dana support cancer research programs; Awkwafina, Mariah and Chaka Khan bring music and education to underserved communities; Brie chooses film projects where she can position herself as an ally to issues she cares about. In a series of videos, the women also offer insights on all sorts of things from #MeToo to anxiety to being taken seriously in business.

“Earn that power”

Jennifer Aniston may be a heavyweight in the industry, but when she was starting her production company in the early 2000s, she wasn’t taken seriously. She says she had to prove that she earned that power and force people to take her seriously.

“Power means confidence,” she told Variety. “Belief in yourself, belief in what you are doing. Find your voice, find your strength and don’t let anyone else dim your spirit, your light, and what you have to bring to the table.”

She added that women need to support each other and band together rather than let society pit them against each other.

“Tell your own story”

Awkwafina has been open about her anxiety in the past and explained that part of finding her power was figuring out how to push negative thoughts, fear and impostor syndrome aside to tell her own story and stand up for herself.

“To think you’re powerful in the most positive of ways is to be able to tell your own story,” she said. “Being able to sit in a room and say, ‘Hey, that’s not right.’ I think using power to bolster up a greater good rather than just bolstering up yourself is how I’m realizing I use it.”

She added that it has been other women in the industry—like Kate McKinnon on Saturday Night Live and Anne Hathaway while filming Oceans 8—who helped her see her own potential and feel more comfortable with her own talent.

It’s all about controlling your own destiny

Mariah is currently writing her memoir (we can’t wait to read that whole thing in one sitting) and she says a huge part of her power (as a person, not that unbelievable vocal power) is coming from nothing and fighting to gain control of the factors in her own life.

“My empowerment comes from having faith,” she said. “It comes from growing up in a place where I didn’t have anything and having to struggle to get to a place where I could be in control of my own life.” She added that an important driving force for her was focusing on the fact that she was in charge of her own destiny.

“These things have happened to me”

Mariah also gave her thoughts on #MeToo and the current cultural moment for women’s empowerment. Since her career began when she was a young girl surrounded by older men in the music industry, Mariah revealed that she longed for a strong female role model.

“I didn’t have a powerful woman by my side to say, ‘No, you’re not paying for this. You’re not doing all that. They’re trying to take advantage of you here,’” she said. “You have to learn whether it’s being an artist or being a woman, ‘I’m allowed to have my feelings and express them.’”

She admitted that the #MeToo Movement has opened her eyes to a lot of inappropriate situations she’s been in over the course of her career. She added that she “went along with” those situations because that was just the way things were. “These things have happened to me,” she said. “I really respect the women who have come forward and paved the way so the newer generation of women don’t have to deal with this.”

“Perfect” doesn’t exist so chill

Mariah went on to talk about how women are conditioned to always strive for perfection and try to come off as quiet and calm. She’s done with it.

“Oftentimes we’re told not to be very expressive about our feelings as women because it’s a turn-off and you know what, I don’t really care!” she said. “I’m sick of trying to have to be perfect for everyone because you can never live up to their expectations. Ever.”