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After winning the previous four gold titles in women’s Olympic hockey, the Canadian team fell to the Americans in a shootout, losing out on that fifth gold by a score of 3-2 in the final. It was a disappointing blow to the team and the 36 million Canadians back home, but no one showed it more than defender Jocelyne Larocque at the medal ceremony. When that silver medal was placed around her neck, she immediately whipped it back off and stood holding it in one hand sullenly for the rest of the event. We get that silver in hockey is barely a consolation prize for a Canadian, but that’s not cool.

NBC Olympics — who was obviously a little salty that the Canadians weren’t taking the loss well — tweeted their coverage of the event and the moment quickly went viral. Americans were offended. Canadians were offended. Americans were angry. Canadians were understanding. There seemed to be no limit to the number of opinions out there.

Some Canadians were supportive of Larocque, who was part of the gold-winning team at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi. They noted that while for some Olympic sports, silver is for the second-best competitor, silver in hockey goes to the team who loses. True, but you did a lot of winning to even get that far.

Friday morning, Larocque apologized to the IOC, her team and the Canadians back home for her emotion-fueled lapse in judgement. She said in a statement that she “meant no disrespect” but “let her emotions get the better of [her].”

“For all the fans young and old, please understand this was a moment in time I truly wish I could take back,” she wrote, “I take seriously being a role model to young girls and representing our country. My actions did not demonstrate the values our team, myself and my family live and for that I am truly sorry.”

For the most part, it seems Canadians are accepting the apology — and acknowledging how stereotypically Canadian it was issue one.