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It was supposed to be a celebratory screening for the 20th anniversary of Wag the Dog. Stars Dustin Hoffman, Robert De Niro, director Barry Levinson and producer Jane Rosenthal showed up for the panel to discuss the film in what was supposed to be your garden variety Q&A stuff with host and moderator John Oliver. It was all going fine until about 20 minutes in when Oliver brought up the current climate of sexual harassment in Hollywood and that’s when the poop hit the fan. In a good way. OK, good for everyone but Hoffman.

Deadline reports Levinson “managed a thoughtful response,” but things between John and Dustin got a little more intense, and that tension would last for another half hour.

“You’ve made one statement in print,” Oliver said to Hoffman, who issued an apology following accusations that he inappropriately touched then-17-year-old production assistant Anna Graham Hunter during the filming of Death of a Salesman in 1985. “Does that feel like enough to you?”

Hoffman replied, “First of all, it didn’t happen, the way she reported,” then proceeded to say his apology was widely misconstrued.

“This is something we’re going to have to talk about because … it’s hanging in the air,” said Oliver, to which Hoffman replied, “It’s hanging in the air? From a few things you’ve read you’ve made an incredible assumption about me.” The actor added that he “still had no idea who this woman is,” claiming to have never met her and if he did, it was “in concert with other people.”

And when Hoffman said the claims against him were not “reflective” of who he is, Oliver fired back.

“It is reflective of who you were,” Oliver continued, according to Vanity Fair.  “You’ve given no evidence to show that it didn’t happen. There was a period of time when you were creeping around women. It feels like a cop-out to say, ‘Well, this isn’t me.’ Do you understand how that feels like a dismissal?”

“I get no pleasure from this conversation,” Oliver admitted. “But you and I are not the victims here.” And there it is. Bravo, Mr. Oliver. Calling out Hoffman at a film panel may seem like the wrong place for Oliver to have done it but, really, it was the perfect place. ANYWHERE is the perfect place, as long as it keeps happening.

There needs to be more people like John Oliver, willing to put themselves out there, ask the tough questions, put these alleged assailants on the spot, and call out this despicable behaviour however, wherever and whenever possible. How else will there be any change?