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On November 9, The Washington Post ran an article detailing the misconduct of Alabama’s Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate Roy Moore. In the article, a woman named Leigh Corfman alleges that when Moore was 32-years-old and a district attorney, he pursued a relationship with Corfman. At the time of the incident, Corfman was 14.

In addition to Corfman, three more women interviewed by The Washington Post said Moore pursued relationships with them when they were between the ages of 16 and 18 and Moore was in his early 30’s.

Moore, who is now 70, has denied the allegations, releasing a statement saying, “These allegations are completely false and are a desperate political attack by the National Democrat Party and the Washington Post on this campaign.”

The story has made international headlines, with Saturday Night Live even tackling the allegations during their cold open this past weekend. Now the allegations of abuse have spread onto social media, where a movement aimed at reminding people just how young 14-year-olds are has gone viral.

Lizz Winstead is an American comedian and co-creator of The Daily Show. She began the #MeAt14 thread on social media in response to the allegations that a then 32-year-old Moore pursued a 14-year-old Corfman. Urging users to share pictures of themselves when they were 14 and recount what life was like in their early teen years, the hashtag has now gone viral. Acting as a reminder that 14-year-olds are still children, Winstead posted her own photo, writing “I was on the gymnastics team and sang in the choir. I was not dating a 32 year old man. Who were you at 14?”

Actor Alyssa Milano, who was instrumental in starting the #MeToo hashtag movement, shared her own #MeAt14 story, which included the then-Who’s The Boss star loving the 1980’s band OMD and being happy and innocent.

News anchor and journalist Katie Couric wrote that she was trying to learn the dance the ‘hustle,’ not be hustled by older men.

Nell Scovell, who wrote the TV series Sabrina The Teenage Witch from 1996 – 2003, shared a picture of herself from a high school production of Guys and Dolls.

Sarah Silverman tried to inject some humor into the movement, joking that her math teacher was also her boyfriend.

Broadway actor Stephanie J. Block shared her own teenage pic from a time she dreamed of being on stage.

Highlighting their youth, the #MeAt14 movement is a stark reminder that 14-year-olds are not old enough to consent.

This Twitter user was still loving cartoons on Saturday mornings.

Some users are now taking the opportunity to share their own stories of being assaulted at a young age through the #MeAt14 hashtag.

Men have also begun sharing their stories, including economics and policy analyst Timothy McBride, whose tweet is a stark reminder that sexual assault happens to girls and boys, men and women.

Twitter user Bradley Julian also shared his horrifying experience as a teen.

One Twitter user summed up the #MeAt14 thread best.