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While the federal Conservatives are in hot water for an offensive campaign ad, the Liberals are in a bit of a scandal of their own over some offensive tweets. Ah, politics.

Over the weekend, Liberal MP Adam Vaughan took a jab at Ontario Premier Doug Ford over his reversal on the proposed plan to axe full-day kindergarten. He tweeted in part, “Next [Ford] will go after young offenders & end ‘free school’ in detention centres…instead of playing whack-a-mole; Let’s just whack him.”

The context of the tweet (talking about prison) along with the use of the term “whack” (often used by TV mobsters to mean “kill”), might suggest to the casual reader that Vaughan is calling for the murder of the incumbent Premier of Ontario. Whatever your views on Doug Ford, that’s not cool.

After facing immediate backlash from Conservatives and others online, Vaughan issued a facetious apology, not to Ford, but to the Moles of Ontario for associating them with Ford. He also shared several photos of whac-a-mole games with Ford’s head photoshopped where the moles would be and tagged the post #sometoriesarewhack.

He followed up the joke tweet with a more serious one, clarifying that “whack” was meant to reference the whac-a-mole game, not to “suggest anyone, anywhere should inflict real physical harm to Premier Ford.”

Monday in the House of Commons, Conservative House Leader Candice Bergen brought up the issue, reminding her colleagues that “[whack is] a mobster term for killing someone, which clearly the parliamentary secretary [Vaughan] should have known.” She also questioned why Justin Trudeau hadn’t yet called for Vaughan’s resignation.

Trudeau postponed answering the question, first paying tribute to late Auditor General Michael Ferguson who passed away over the weekend. Bergen, however, pressed him again to respond, referencing a 2017 incident when Conservative MP Alice Wong accused Vaughan of “elder abuse” as a history of inappropriate conduct.

“The member in question has apologized for his tweet,” Trudeau responded. “It is important that we have civil debate in this house when we engage in matters– disagreements over public policy.”

Bergen informed the House that the tweet had not yet been deleted (and it still hasn’t, as of publishing) and questioned how Trudeau can speak about “positive politics” and “zero tolerance” while overlooking Vaughan’s actions. Trudeau reiterated his earlier point and would not agree to discipline Vaughan or ask for his resignation.

“As I said, the parliamentary secretary has apologized for his tweet and I think it’s really important that we remember that there can be strong agreements over policy, over questions of substance, but we need to remain civil and keep away from the personal accusations, the personal invectives whenever we have political debates,” he said.

Who would have thought in 1867 that tweets with badly-photoshopped photos of childhood arcade games would be a significant subject discussed in the House of Commons?