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It’s been two weeks since the announcement–and subsequent reversal–of the new CRA rule taxing employee discounts as income and one week since finance minister Bill Morneau was embroiled in a conflict-of-interest controversy. Yes, October has not been great for the Liberals when it comes to taxes and as if they needed another financial flub, they’re now under fire for going back on a long-standing disability tax credit for people with type 1 diabetes.

In May, the revenue department stopped approving a tax credit that was previously allowed for people who need more than 14 hours of insulin therapy per week with a doctor’s certification. For the average diabetic person, the disease can end up costing around $15,000 a year. This benefit would typically ease that by $1,500. In the previous seven months, thousands of people who would have previously been eligible for the benefit have been rejected (the CRA has not released exact numbers).

On Sunday, Diabetes Canada and the Conservative opposition teamed up to push back on the issue. The Conservatives reiterated a point they’ve been making since Trudeau took office–and that has been increasingly evident this month–that the Liberal government is completely out of touch with the middle class they campaigned on building up. Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre even went so far as to say that the ‘government is targeting vulnerable people suffering with diabetes with thousands of dollars in tax increases.’

He’s certainly not alone in viewing this change as preying on the less fortunate. Many Canadians are calling it a ‘tax grab’ and consider it unethical to deny so many people such a life-saving credit.

When Canadians expressed their outrage at the employee discount tax, the backlash prompted reconsideration and the policy was reversed. Maybe Canada can do it again.