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It’s been a restful few months for the Philae Lander.

Back in November, the stove-sized robot successfully landed on a comet, where it was supposed to gather information about the space rock as part of the Rosetta mission. The objectives were to analyze the chemical makeup of the space rock and determine how it interacts with the sun. Philae was even tweeting back its progress:

At some point, however, the machine’s anchoring mechanism failed and it slid across to an area with no sunlight, leaving its batteries deprived of solar energy. Soon, Philae shut down, and scientists have been trying to communicate with it ever since.

That’s why officials with the European Space Agency were baffled when the comet lander suddenly contacted them. The agency received a surprise signal from the lander, which also transmitted a host of data.

Officials are now eagerly awaiting the lander’s next contact, as its memory still contains more than 8,000 data packets that will tell them what’s been happening on the comet recently. The timing for its sudden wakeup call couldn’t have been better, either. The comet Philae is on is expected to make its closest approach to the sun yet in August, and amazing images should follow. The Rosette spacecraft, meanwhile, couldn’t be happier to know it’s lander is safe and sound.

According to CNN, Scientists say that Philae has already helped change the overall perception of comets in space. So let’s just hope she doesn’t take another nap before August.