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The Invictus Games aren’t really about who wins or loses, it’s about injured soldiers being given the opportunity to represent their country again and heal through sport. We’re allowed to be proud of our athletes/veterans though and it looks like we have good reason to be. Team Canada’s co-captain, Natacha Dupuis has already taken home three gold medals and she’s not even done yet. Her golds are in the 100 meter, 200 meter and 400 meter races, and she’s competing in the indoor rowing competition tonight.

‘It’s been a wonderful experience,’ she told Your Morning, ‘My first experience was last year. I got to represent Canada and this is exactly what it’s about. For us ill and injured athletes to be asked to wear the Canadian colours once again despite our injury, it’s quite an experience.’

Dupuis is from Gatineau, Quebec and served in Bosnia and Afghanistan with the Canadian Armed Forces. She was diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder after her second tour in Kandahar when she witnessed the deaths of two soldiers and the serious injury of others in a land mine blast. Dupuis suffered from insomnia, flashbacks, panic attacks and survivors’ guilt, but is working to manage her symptoms. Sport has been particularly helpful in doing that.

‘Sports have been a major part in my recovery,’ she said, ‘It’s what helps me the most. Things like the Invictus Games provide us with the opportunities to overcome the challenges and I feel so fortunate to have been given this opportunity.’ It seems like gratefulness for the games and comradery is common among all the athletes regardless of nation.

‘The competition with the Invictus Games is very friendly,’ Dupuis said, ‘We all have this in common: being injured during service. It’s not the Olympics. It’s not so much about medals. Medals are nice, but at the end of the day, it’s more about overcoming our adversity and our injuries.’