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It’s been almost 10 months since comedian Louis C.K. was outed in the Me Too movement for sexual misconduct, specifically using his power and status to force aspiring female comics to watch him masturbate. Ten months is a long time for some things — like using the same toothbrush, keeping leftovers in the fridge or ignoring a text message — but it’s a very short time for other things — like waiting to get back to business as usual after admitting to being a serial sexual harasser.

C.K. returned to his former haunt, the Comedy Cellar in New York, this week for a surprise stand up performance, his first time taking the stage since his exposure. The Comedy Cellar is a place where C.K. has done walk-on performances in the past and the club features in the opening sequence of his TV show, Louie. It was the perfect venue (and audience) for a comeback.

The performer reportedly did a quick set covering topics characteristic of his comedy including racism, server tipping and parades, but avoided the topic of sexism and did not address his own controversy at all. The crowd was receptive to the set and gave a standing ovation at the end.

On the interwebs, the reception was not quite as positive and reignited the debate surrounding the question, “What is the appropriate amount of time for a prominent figure accused of sexual misconduct to wait before returning to the spotlight?”

While some were willing to give the comedian a shot, others pointed out that it was totally inappropriate for him to stage a comeback, especially so soon. The point was also made that he wasn’t “punished” for his actions other than by public outcry. If he had been found guilty of the crimes he admitted to committing in his apology, he would have been in jail for longer than he’s been out of the spotlight.

Some thoughtful editorials were also written in response to the wider conversation about letting these powerful men back into public life. An article in The Cut makes the point that the fact we’re even having that discussion reinforces the power structures that allowed these men to get away with sexual harassment and assault for years, or in some cases, decades.

The best thing to come out of this ordeal? Women supporting women and lifting up female comedians. The outrage online revealed a community of people who are not going to let sexual abusers get away with returning to their careers after a few months spent out of the public eye.

If you’re really hurting for good comedy, Twitter has a plethora of suggestions for good female comics who have not, to our knowledge, been accused of sexual misconduct.