Life You
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

Malala Yousafzai – youngest-ever Nobel Peace Prize winner and all-around incredible human being – returned to her hometown in Pakistan last week for the first time since she was shot in the head by the Taliban. Malala and two other girls were seriously injured in an attempt on her life in 2012 and, after being flown to the U.K. for treatment, Malala has not seen her home country since. This trip was part of the activist’s continued effort to bring education to girls worldwide.

Over the course of the four-day trip, Malala met with the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Shahid Abbasi, and visited her home in the Swat Valley region. Considering the events of the last time Malala was at home, the heightened security on her trip makes details about her time there scarce. Reports say she didn’t shy away from the subjects that put her in danger in the first place, though. She advocated for greater access to education for girls in the country, then visited with old friends and stopped by her old school.

“My first visit to Swat valley after five and a half years since the attack,” she wrote in her school’s guestbook, according to CNN, “I have felt so happy. I am proud of my land and culture. The cadet college is beautiful and I thank the staff and principal for welcoming me. Best wishes and prayers, Malala.”

“I miss everything about Pakistan . . . from the rivers, the mountains, to even the dirty streets and the garbage around our house,” she told Reuters Friday.

Malala is currently studying politics, philosophy and economics at Oxford University in England while also working with the Malala Fund to continue the work she started almost a decade ago in her small town in Pakistan. The Fund works to support education programs for young girls in developing countries including Nigeria, Jordan, Syria and Kenya. Malala says that when she has finished her studies, she would like to once again make Pakistan her home.