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As unifying as the term “feminist” may seem for women, there are few issues on which all feminists agree. There are women who see one form of activism as better than others; there are other women who all-out condemn some forms of activism; there are others still who say it’s counter productive to raise one type of feminist above another. Then there are another 12 positions on the same thing. We can all agree that all people should have equal rights and opportunities regardless of gender, race, sexual orientation or any other distinction, but that’s about it.

One feminist who has never been shy when it comes to speaking (and writing) her truth is Canadian author Margaret Atwood (of The Handmaid’s Tale fame). On Saturday, Atwood had an op-ed published in The Globe and Mail calling out some aspects of the Me Too movement that she sees as problematic. Her piece is entitled “Am I a Bad Feminist?” and explores just that. Is Margaret Atwood a “Bad Feminist” for criticizing a feminist movement, or is there room for both supporting women and questioning some of their methods?

Atwood asserts that if feminism believes women to be equal to men, that means they need to be treated and viewed as humans rather than saints (who are morally superior on principle) or children (who are incapable of agency or making tough moral decisions). With this in mind, Atwood says we need to examine Me Too’s “guilty because accused” method of “vigilante justice.” She points out that women are capable of making false claims of sexual assault and it actually undercuts the movement to assume every man guilty without the “usual rules of evidence.” It adds fuel to the anti-feminist argument that women are poor decision-makers.

Atwood elaborates on that claim by returning to a statement she and others have made recently — that the Me Too movement is similar to the Salem Witch Trials. She also clarifies her argument on this point.

“There are, at present, three kinds of ‘witch’ language,” she writes, “1) Calling someone a witch, as applied lavishly to Hillary Clinton during the recent election. 2) ‘Witchhunt,’ used to imply that someone is looking for something that doesn’t exist. 3) The structure of the Salem witchcraft trials, in which you were guilty because accused. I was talking about the third use.” She’s talking about due process. Me Too dispels with “innocent until proven guilty” in favour of eradicating from society any man who has been accused of sexual misconduct.

She adds that this type of justice — wherein society condemns, destroys and alienates men who have been accused immediately — is a “symptom of a broken legal system.” She argues that all feminists (good or bad) should direct their anger at this system, rather than at each other or men who may or may not be guilty, and consider how to either change it or tear it down.

All her arguments culminate in her interpretation of an incident at the University of British Columbia where a professor was accused of some form of undisclosed misconduct. He was ousted from the school before a full investigation was made into the allegations. Atwood was one of many authors who signed an open letter to the university criticizing its handling of the situation and for denying the professor due process.

As you might expect, speaking against the Me Too movement has elicited some hateful backlash. In the days after the op-ed came out, people ruthlessly criticized Atwood’s arguments online. Unfortunately, a lot of the backlash was based on misconstrued conceptions of her wording and stance. Other readers agreed with her view.

Atwood took to Twitter in the days after to dispel some of the misconceptions and address some reader concerns specifically. Clearly, she stands by everything she wrote in the piece.