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Margot Robbie landed her first Vogue cover, the June issue, and the star of the upcoming movies Suicide Squad and The Legend of Tarzan shared with the magazine exactly how she looks so good. This ain’t no low-maintenance gal. The actress’ beauty inspo? Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) of American Psycho, obviously.

In what is virtually a shot-for-shot remake of Bateman’s morning routine, Robbie prepares for her days in a similarly eccentric way as he before her (though his Les Misérables poster next to the toilet has been replaced by her Hamilton one).

Robbie also uses refrigerated metal spoons for her puffy eyes, rather than Bateman’s chilled eye pack, which she holds to her face while going through various yoga poses. She discusses the importance of being born with a six pack and that she no longer needs to wash her hair because it cleans itself. Her facial toner of choice is placenta-infused, to give her “that third trimester glow without the cravings.” There are a bunch of other products, the all-important mask, but whatever. It’s all just that easy for Robbie.

“There is an idea of Margot Robbie, some kind of abstraction. But there is no real me. Only an entity, something illusory.” And then it starts to shift, as her Australian accent kicks in.

“And though I can hide my cold gaze and you can shake my hand and feel flesh shaking yours. And maybe you can even sense our lifestyles are probably comparable. I simply am not there.” But if you think that’s what it takes to become one of Hollywood’s most sought-after leading ladies, think again. This is Margot Robbie at her parody-making finest. The natural beauty, who really does keep it simple, has the last laugh in this American Psycho spoof directed by Catfish‘s Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost.

That final psychotic gaze into the camera is totally spine-chilling — until she breaks into a smile and we see the real Margot, dancing goofily around the room. You know she’s having a chuckle, poking fun at all this beauty stuff. Kinda scary? Nah. Kinda awesome.