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Well Mark Zuckerberg is at it again, folks, making changes nobody asked for to our favourite (and not-so-favourite) social media platforms. Facebook confirmed at the end of last week that they are actively working on integrating Facebook Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp to work on one technical infrastructure by sometime in 2020. The platforms will reportedly remain as separate apps, but will share data more freely than they already do.

“We’re working on making more of our messaging products end-to-end encrypted and considering ways to make it easier to reach friends and family across networks,” Facebook wrote in a statement to the New York Times. The change is part of an effort to “build the best messaging experiences we can; and people want messaging to be fast, simple, reliable and private.”

We’ll see about that.

The three platforms (all owned by Facebook since 2014) have a reported 2.6 billion users between them and the new integration is being billed as a service to those users who might find the experience of messaging more streamlined. Only there’s likely a far more sinister reason for the change — ad dollars and Zuckerberg control.

In the past, Mark Zuckerberg said that he had no interest in merging the three platforms (Facebook and Instagram in particular) but in the past year or so, he has taken a bigger interest in his non-Facebook entities. It’s reportedly Zuck’s increased involvement that led to the resignations of one WhatsApp’s co-founder last April and both Instagram’s co-founders last September.

There are also security and anti-trust concerns surrounding the integration. Facebook insisted in its statement that the company would be working on new forms of encryption, but merging Facebook and WhatsApp would fundamentally change the way the latter works. WhatsApp requires only a phone number to work whereas Facebook requires a full and real identity. It’s also very clear that Facebook and Instagram messages are not secure (meaning they can use the information therein to advertise to you) while WhatsApp has built a reputation for keeping minimal user data — something lauded by security experts. The integration would likely veer more in the direction of Facebook Messenger rather than the security of WhatsApp.

Whats more, a Democratic representative from Silicon Valley wrote on Twitter that the entire acquisition of Instagram and WhatsApp by Facebook should have been more intensely scrutinized by the government. Hmmm.

Other Twitter users were unhappy with the impending integration too.

There were a few people online, however, who saw the benefits of the integration. Specifically, the fact that it seems like commonsense to merge your three biggest entities from a business standpoint.