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When you travel to Kitchener-Waterloo during a leg of The Amazing Race Canada (Tuesdays, 9 p.m. ET, CTV) you know that you’re going to face at least one math or science based-challenge. The Ontario city is basically the Silicon Valley of Canada, after all.

Unfortunately, as anyone who works in an non-math-based field can attest, picking up a calculator and pounding out an equation years after you’ve last done so is mighty challenging. Trish and Amy were definitely reminded of that the hard way.

The Etobicoke, Ont. moms, who arrived last on the mat during a non-elimination leg in Saskatchewan last week, were strong out of the gate on Tuesday night. They fought Sam and Sarah for the pen to land the final spot on the first bus out of the airport. They whizzed through the ball challenge at the THEMUSEUM’s Spectrum exhibit, and they completed their Speed Bump (riding in an autonomous-driving Chevrolet Bolt EV) with ease. They even proved their excellent communication skills once again by completing the robot task fairly quickly. But once they arrived at the Face Off, things began unravelling.

There, the moms over-cheesed their pizza, which allowed sisters Joanne and Lauren to take the lead. By the time they arrived at the aforementioned math challenge at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (a place straight out of The Big Bang Theory), they were well behind and just never caught up. Once again they were the last to arrive on the mat—hours after first-place finishers Dave and Irina—and this time they were eliminated.

We caught up with the moms to find out what it was really like racing through all that tension and how their kids reacted to seeing them on TV.

So how are you both feeling about math this morning?

Trish: I’m so upset that it was our demise. That and cheese pizza. Because if we’d done the pizza we may have had a bit more time to figure it out.

Amy: The math killed us. And actually it was even harder because my grade-nine-aged daughter sat beside me and was like, “Mom, it’s so easy!” Yes so kids, when you think math isn’t going to get you somewhere? It’s going to get you somewhere. Pay attention in math class!

What have your kids’ reactions been like watching you on the show?

Trish: They’ve been really excited, they’re like, ‘Mom, we’re watching you on TV!’ They’re telling their friends at summer camp.

Amy: They think it’s really, really cool. We have some cool mom status now because we’re on TV and they’re popular now with all their friends. It’s so great for them to see us, especially under pressure and how we react to certain situations.

Trish: And how we played the game. We tried to play fairly and with integrity. And also try to challenge ourselves and do things outside of our comfort zone. I think they were proud of us.

How would you describe the tension between the teams by the time you were eliminated?

Trish: They were really, really not happy to see us come back. The first non-elimination I think people expected that it might be a non-elim because it was the fourth leg. They were happy to see us back and had open arms but this time was very different. We got lots of nasty looks when we came into the airport. They weren’t happy with it because we’d taken up another non-elim spot. But by the time we left it was also feeling a little less friendly than it was in the previous leg because it was getting down to less teams.

Amy: People were starting to feel the pressure now that the other non-elim was gone. That really stepped up the competition. And people, rather than trying to make friends now, are in it to win it. And that’s really the ultimate goal.

Did Dave and Irina help set that tone with the way they’ve been playing?

Trish: Absolutely! They are being portrayed as the villains and the funny thing is that they’re playing their game and they’re not apologizing for it. We had a certain amount of respect for it because that was their game, that was how they were playing, there were things they did that we weren’t happy about, like cheating and the comments, but as we played the game we didn’t actually get to see what they were saying about us behind our backs. So watching it now on television like everybody else, it’s a little bit more of an eye-opener.

Have you reached out to them since the show?

Trish: Maybe no.

Amy: And we don’t follow their social media. No, they’re proud of the way they played. In their eyes they didn’t break any rules and they’re proud. It makes for great TV, you have to admit that.

Are you proud of the way you ran the race?

Trish: There were times when the kids told us, ‘Mom you should have done this,’ or, ‘You should have been a little meaner.’ We tried, like when I wrestled with Sam for that last marker he was not going to rip it out of my hands. My cold, dead hands was the only way he was getting it! We did try to put up more of a fight and not give any leeway. The thing about being nice though, our nature as mothers is to be caregivers. It’s hard to shut that off and just be cold and distant to other people. So we were proud of the way we played and if that meant maybe we played with a little too much heart then I was okay with that.

Who do you want to win?

Amy: I would like to see Aarthy and Thinesh win because of what they did with Anthony and James at the clams challenge. Like who does that? Who helps someone get to the mat at the same time like that when it’s a race? That speaks volumes to their character and they deserve it.

Trish: James and Anthony, Aarthy and Thinesh or Sam and Sarah. Any of those three teams I would be proud to have win because they really are great examples of the Canadian spirit.

The Amazing Race Canada airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. ET on CTV.