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Anne Innis Dagg has been called the Jane Goodall of giraffes. In 1956, she travelled to South Africa—alone—to study them in the wild, which resulted in her 1976 book, The Giraffe. That book is still studied in universities today.

In the new documentary, The Woman Who Loves Giraffes, we learn just how far Anne had to stick her neck out to follow her dreams.

Pursuing her passion to study the behaviour of giraffes didn’t come easy for Anne, a woman graduating from university in the 1950s. Women scientists weren’t really a thing. Not yet, anyways. When Anne took her trip to South Africa, it was still several years before Goodall began her lifelong work with chimps.

While in Africa, Anne spent 10 hours in the field, watching giraffes from her car as she took notes. Her observations of giraffe behaviour were the first of their kind—for any African animal, in fact. She was the first t observe homosexual behaviour in male giraffes, and also witnessed fights between male giraffes jockeying for status. She also learned that male giraffes will taste a female giraffe’s urine to test their fertility. (Ew.)

Intrigued? Here are more fascinating things you probably didn’t know about these majestic creatures.

They sleep standing up

Ouch.

When giraffes give birth, their babies fall more than five feet

Double ouch.

An hour after that long fall, baby giraffes can already stand and run

Talk about motivation!

Giraffes are pros at power naps

They only need five to 30 minutes of sleep per day and often take quick naps that only last a minute or two.

You don’t want to mess with a giraffe

It’s kick is so strong, it could kill a lion.

They only need to drink water once every few days

Eight cups of water per day? Not for giraffes. They get most of their hydration from the plants they eat.

A giraffe’s tongue can be 20-inches long

It’s dark in colour to protect it from the sun.

Giraffe spots are very similar to human fingerprints

No two giraffes have the exact same pattern!

The more you know!