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Tuesday night, the Duchess of Sussex attended her first solo outing since marrying Prince Harry in May and managed to make headlines not for the event itself, but for closing her own car door when she arrived at the Royal Academy of Arts.

Meghan was at the museum for the opening of the Oceana exhibit, the first collection of traditional Oceanic art to be displayed in the United Kingdom. The art was collected from across New Zealand, Fiji, the Kingdom of Tonga and Australia – the very same countries Meghan and Harry will visit on their official royal trip in October.

The exhibit is “celebrating the original, raw and powerful art that in time would resonate across the European artistic sphere” and showcases 200 works spanning 500 years. Not only does it include historical pieces from as far back as the 18th century, it also features modern depictions of “history, identity and climate change” from contemporary artists.

At the opening, the Duchess met with New Zealand artists, representatives of cultural groups and museum curators. She also watched performances at the official opening presentation by a Māori cultural group – a language and region in New Zealand.

The Duchess stunned in a black belted Givenchy dress paired with cut-out black heels, a black clutch and minimal jewellery.

While Meghan was visiting artists and closing car doors, Prince William was on his own solo trip, though much farther from home. The Royal visited Namibia for several meetings and events with both political and youth leaders on the subject of conservation in the area.

Wills also joined a team of rhino trackers from the Kunene People’s Park Initiative for a day of searching for the endangered creatures. After five hours, the team spotted a black rhino as well as herds of elephants, gazelles and giraffes.

The expedition was part of the program’s effort to end wildlife crime and combat illegal poaching while advocating for increasing the local community’s control over the treatment of their own wildlife.

The Prince’s visit is in connection with the 2018 conference on the Illegal Wildlife Trade which is to take place in London next month. William is the president of United for Wildlife and a patron of Tusk Trust – two organizations working against the illegal wildlife trade. Over the next few days, he will also tour Tanzania and Kenya.