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We’ve always loved watching Prince Harry with kids, but it’s become even more exciting now that we know he and Meghan are expecting a little one of their own. At an outdoor ceremony on Day 15 of their Royal Tour Down Under, Harry and Meghan slipped on some good old fashioned wellingtons for a game of New Zealand welly wanging with a group of kids.

For those unfamiliar (so, we’re assuming most Canadians), welly wanging is a lawn game slightly similar to horseshoes except you’re trying to throw a boot, which is sometimes full of water, as far as possible. The game reportedly originated in the West County of England and has now spread to other areas of Europe and the Commonwealth.

It doesn’t look like Meghan’s American upbringing proved to be any sort of disadvantage, though. The Duchess’s red team beat the Duke’s yellow team by a long shot.

The game was part of the Royals visit to North Shore Riding Club in Auckland for the dedication of the Carol Whaley Native Bush to the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy project – a series of forests marked for conservation by the monarch. This is the third dedication Harry and Meghan have made on the trip.

After the ceremony, the couple planted a native Kōwhai tree, which blooms one of the flowers Meghan had stitched onto her wedding veil as a tribute to the Commonwealth countries.

As the couple was leaving the park, they were given some toddler-sized wellingtons (with kiwis on them!) for the new addition to their family as well as a few other gifts. Their kid is definitely set in the protective footwear department. When the Sussexes visited Australia at the beginning of their trip, they were gifted a pair of Ugg boots by the Governor General.

The Royals’ next visit was to the boys and girls at the Pillars organization, which supports children whose parents have been incarcerated by offering mentorship programs and other services. When the Duke and Duchess were married in May, the government of New Zealand donated $5,000 NZD to the charity as a wedding present.

Meghan and Harry were joined by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and together, they presented awards to youth leaders in the organization. Prince Harry also said a few words to the volunteers and staff who are responsible for helping Pillars bring the community together.

“We became aware of Pillars earlier this year, when the New Zealand Government kindly suggested it would make a donation to Pillars on behalf of the people of New Zealand to celebrate our marriage,” the Duke said. “You are outstanding young people, and I know you will use this opportunity to create exciting futures for yourselves and to act as role models for others.”

After the engagement, Harry and Meghan joined the Prime Minister for a public walkabout where they met their admirers, chatted about their trip and gushed some more about the baby. Harry told an admirer that he’s “over the moon” about being a father, adding that he’s ready for the challenge and joy of parenting.

In the evening, the Royals attended a youth-centered reception hosted by Prime Minister Ardern at the Auckland War Memorial Museum. The guests were mostly young leaders, from 17 to 25 years old, who are making differences in their communities. Harry made another address to encourage them in their pursuits and let youth across the Commonwealth know that people are listening to them and see them as the future.

“In my role as Commonwealth Youth Ambassador, it is a privilege to champion so many exceptionally talented young leaders across all 53 countries,” he said. “Your voices are being heard, and each and every one of you is making this change happen.”

There is just one day left on the couple’s two-week Oceania adventure and they will spend it attending more conservation events in New Zealand and meeting with members of their adoring public.