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We loved Melanie Griffith alongside Sigourney Weaver in the ’80s classic Working Girl. The big hair and big-shouldered business suits made us long for a spot on the corporate ladder in the Big Apple, and Griffith’s character Tess McGill was ambitious and stylish on screen.

But the face of the 30-year-old actor we knew in the late ’80s has changed. Obviously, right? Age comes for us all. But Griffith, living within the social pressure cooker that is Hollywood, opted to undergo cosmetic procedures that she would come to regret.

In a new interview with Porter magazine, the actress opens up about bad work she had done by a doctor.

“I didn’t [realize] until people started saying. ‘Oh my god, what has she done?!'” Griffith tells Porter magazine. “I was so hurt, I went to a different doctor and he started dissolving all of this s— that this other woman doctor had put in. Hopefully, I look more normal now.”

The now 59-year-old had been moving from “aging gracefully” into “plastically preserved” territory. It’s a look we’ve seen on more than a few Hollywood faces; too much filler in the cheeks creating unnatural puffiness, and a heavy-handed injection of Botox in the brow that raises the eyebrows into a permanently surprised look. To a degree, it can look good — and more importantly, if it makes you happy then all the power to you — but sometimes we take it too far.

Here’s Griffith in 1990, at the age of 33.

Getty Images

And here she is in late 2015.

GettyImages

And now, here she is in the latest issue of Porter looking fabulous, healthy and beautiful.

Annabel Mehran/Porter magazine

We think the more natural look suits Griffith well, and we hope the eligible bachelors of Los Angeles agree. In the Porter interview, Griffith also admits it’s been ages since she’s has a night on the town with a suitor. “I’m shy with men now, very reticent … nobody has asked me on a date [for almost two years],” she says.

This kind of story from a woman we respect is great to read — it’s brave of Griffith to speak about such personal issues, and we’re all a little better off for it.